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By Timeform -- published 5th February 2014

A guide to the symbols you'll find in Race Passes and Timeform Race Cards

Abbreviations

The following symbols are used with (or sometimes in place of) Timeform Ratings.

p commonly referred to as a small 'p'; the horse is likely to improve
P commonly referred to as a large 'P'; the horse is capable of much better
+ the horse may be better than rated
? the rating is suspect or (used alone) the horse is out of form or cannot be assessed with confidence
§ the 'Timeform squiggle'; the horse is unreliable (for temperamental or other reasons)
§§ the 'double squiggle'; the horse is so unsatisfactory as to be not worth a rating
x a poor jumper
xx so bad a jumper as to be not worth a rating
   

You will also find the following In-Play symbols used in Race Passes.

Start
1 led/disputed lead
2 prominent/close up
3 mid-division
4 towards rear
5 behind
S very slowly away
s slowly away
O badly outpaced
o badly outpaced
Mid
K travelled notably strongly
k travelled comfortably
L raced very lazily
l raced lazily/went in snatches
P pulled very hard
p pulled hard
J jumped very well
j jumped well
xx made numerous mistakes
x made mistakes
End
F found nothing
f found less than seemed likely
I idled markedly
i idled
R responded really well to pressure
r responded to pressure
§ signs of temperament
§§ marked reluctance
   

Equipment carried abbreviations are as follows.

b blinkers
es eyeshield
h hood
s (sheepskin) cheekpieces
t tongue tie
v visor
   

In addition, the following abbreviations are used.

3 b.c. means three-year-old bay colt. You may also see br (brown), ch (chestnut), gr (grey) or ro (roan), and h (horse), g (gelding), f (filly) or m (mare).
p8.1g In Flat racing form figures: the surface if not turf (f - fibresand; p - polytrack; t - tapeta; a - any other artificial surface), the distance (in furlongs to the nearest tenth of a furlong), and the going (as returned by Timeform). The going abbreviations are h (hard), f (firm or fast), m (good to firm), g (good or standard), d (dead), s (soft or slow) and v (heavy)
c24v In jumps racing form figures: c (steeplechase), h (hurdle) and b (bumper/National Hunt Flat race), followed by the distance rounded to the nearest furlong and the going as for Flat racing. Bumpers run on any all-weather surface are prefaced with 'a'.
G1 Group/Grade 1. Similarly G2 (Group/Grade 2), G3 (Group/Grade 3), L (Listed), W (weight-for-age/conditions), M (maiden). N (novice), S (seller), C (claiming event), A (amateurs event). Where a number appears in the ratings summary, rather than a letter, this is the BHB mark off which the horse ran in a handicap.
TRW Timeform Ratings of Winners. The weight-adjusted Timeform rating that the winner of the race has achieved in each of the last five years.
TWFA Timeform weight-for-age. Timeform race ratings are adjusted to 12-7 (jumps) or 10-0 (Flat) unless shown. So, in a Flat race, TWFA 4 9-13, 3 8-12 indicates that ratings for 3-y-os are adjusted to 8 stone 12 lb and for 4-y-os to 9 stone 13 lb. Any older horses would have their ratings adjusted to 10 stone.
* in form figures indicates 'won'. Other superior figures indicate finishing position (2nd - 6th). Letters used include F (fell), pu (pulled up), ur (unseated rider), bd (brought down), r (refused), su (slipped up), ro (ran out) and co (carried out).

 

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